Science Fair Project:

Childproof or Not?

3.7 based on 39 ratings
Difficulty of Project
Moderate
Cost

Less than $20.00

Safety Issues
None
Material Availability

Gather 3 empty childproof containers each with a different way of opening

Approximate Time Required to Complete the Project

May take up to 5 days to collect the date; one day to prepare the science fair display

To determine whether childproof containers are really childproof

  • 3 empty childproof containers (each must have a different way of opening)
  • Stopwatch

Childproof containers have been developed to prevent young children from harming themselves by taking too much medicine or coming into contact with harmful substances. Unfortunately, many childproof containers are not really childproof.

In this investigation, different childproof containers are tested to see how childproof they really are.

Terms

childproof: not able to be opened by a child

Concepts

Childproof containers were invented to keep children from being accidentally poisoned by medicine and toxic household products.

Research Questions
  • What were childproof containers invented to prevent?
  • How do childproof containers work?
  • Are child proof containers really childproof?
  • Can a young child learn how to open a childproof container?

  1. Gather the childproof containers. Be sure the containers are empty and have been thoroughly cleaned.
  2. Select five subjects who are all four years old. Most school science projects require permission slips for all subjects used in science investigations. Be sure to get all the necessary forms signed.
  3. Show one of the subjects one of the three containers. Tell the subject that he or she has one minute to try and open the container. Use the stopwatch to time one minute. Record the results.
  4. Repeat Step 3 with the other childproof containers.
  5. Next, show the subject how to open the first childproof container. Then give the subject one more minute to try and open the container. Use the stopwatch to time one minute. Record the results.
  6. Repeat Step 5 with the other childproof containers.
  7. Repeat Steps 3 – 6 with each of the subjects.

Articles

“Child Resistant Does Not Mean Childproof” at http://www.consumermedsafety.org/articles.asp?p=mmc_apd_ar200505001

“Poisoning” at http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetails.aspx?p=114&np=305&id=1967

“Poison Prevention Tips” at http://www.alapoisoncenter.org/poison_tips.htm

Author: Nancy Rogers Bosse
Disclaimer and Safety Precautions

Education.com provides the Science Fair Project Ideas for informational purposes only. Education.com does not make any guarantee or representation regarding the Science Fair Project Ideas and is not responsible or liable for any loss or damage, directly or indirectly, caused by your use of such information. By accessing the Science Fair Project Ideas, you waive and renounce any claims against Education.com that arise thereof. In addition, your access to Education.com's website and Science Fair Project Ideas is covered by Education.com's Privacy Policy and site Terms of Use, which include limitations on Education.com's liability.

Warning is hereby given that not all Project Ideas are appropriate for all individuals or in all circumstances. Implementation of any Science Project Idea should be undertaken only in appropriate settings and with appropriate parental or other supervision. Reading and following the safety precautions of all materials used in a project is the sole responsibility of each individual. For further information, consult your state's handbook of Science Safety.

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely