Science Project:

Testing the Relationship Between Eye Color and Sight

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Research Question:

  • Does eye color affect a person’s ability to identify colors in low light?

Does eye color affect our ability to see things? This experiment will explore this question by comparing how well people with light eye color and dark eye color can differentiate colors in a dimly lit room.

Materials:

  • Approximately 45 test subjects (15 with blue eyes, 15 with green eyes, 15 with brown eyes)
  • 1 medium-sized room
  • Blindfold
  • Colored construction paper
  • Tape
  • Notebook for recording results

Experimental Procedure

  1. Gather test subjects with blue, green and brown eyes. Your test subjects should be around the same age and should not wear contact lenses or glasses.
  2. Select a variety of colors from a pack of construction paper, and tape the paper to a wall on the far side of a room.
  3. Ensure that the room is dimly lit, but not completely dark.
  4. Bring one test subject into the room blindfolded and stand them on the side of the room opposite the colored paper.
  5. Once the door to the room is closed, remove the blindfold and ask the subject to immediately identify the colors from left to right.
  6. Record their answers.
  7. After two minutes, ask the test subject to identify the colors again.
  8. Record their answers.
  9. Repeat steps 4-8 with each of your test subjects.
  10. Analyze your results. Calculate the percentage of colors named correctly by each test subject before and after waiting two minutes. For each eye color, what is the average percentage of colors named correctly at baseline and at two minutes? Do you observe any differences among groups? Which eye color has the most accurate results at baseline? At two minutes?

Terms/Concepts: eye color and sight

Author: Megan Doyle
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