May 21, 2019
|
by Jasmine Gibson

EL Support Lesson

Things We Love: Counting to 100

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Number Jump! lesson plan.
Grade Subject View aligned standards
This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Number Jump! lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to count to 100 by ones.

Language

Students will be able to explain strategies for counting to 100.

(2 minutes)
  • Gather students together for a read aloud.
  • Display the book 100 Things That Make Me Happy and introduce the title, author, and illustrator.
  • Ask students to think-pair-share if 100 is a big amount or small amount.
  • Tell the class that today they will be counting to 100!
(5 minutes)
  • Read aloud the text, counting aloud throughout and relating the sequence to the hundreds chart displayed in the classroom.
(5 minutes)
  • Read aloud the text, counting aloud throughout and relating the sequence to the hundreds chart displayed in the classroom.
  • Use the Vocabulary Cards to define or introduce key words for today's lesson. Point to the hundreds chart and say, "This is a counting aid. An aid is something that helps you do something."
  • Have the class echo count after you while you point to each number on the hundreds chart.
  • Model how you are counting in order and explain to the class that when you count 1-100, you want to keep track and count in order from the smallest number (1) to the biggest number (100).
  • Explain that learning to count to 100 is like being a detective looking for patterns or things that repeat. Tell students learning their numbers in order from 1-20 will actually allow them to count to 100. Model this by showing how numbers repeat on the chart.
(5 minutes)
  • Instruct the students to practice counting to 100 by counting aloud with you as you point to each number on the hundreds chart.
  • Assign each student 3-4 numbers (e.g., 1-4, 5-9, etc.) and provide them with colorful cardstock to write each number. Have them draw a picture to represent each number. Then, have them come up to a predesigned bulletin board and staple their beautiful visuals up to create a classroom hundreds chart to refer to throughout the year! Tip Provide students who need extra support with numbers to trace on their cardstock instead.
  • Pass out the Missing Numbers Counting Bee worksheets and have students complete the hundreds chart as a group. Say the numbers aloud and allow students time to fill in their own chart.
  • Ask students to hold up their completeted hundred chart worksheets and instruct them to color in the squares that help them count to 100 by 10s, then practice counting to 100 by 10s as a group.
  • Explain that this is another, faster way to count to 100.
(15 minutes)
  • Explain that now students will get to make a class hundreds chart!
  • Tell the class they they will each be assigned 3-4 numbers (e.g., 1-4, 5-9, etc.) and will use colorful cardstock to write each number (one number per page).
  • Model how they will draw a picture to represent each number. Tip Provide students who need extra support with numbers to trace on their cardstock instead.

Beginning

  • Allow students to count in their home language (L1).
  • Work with students in a teacher-led group, focus on songs or stories that practice counting to 100.

Advanced

  • Pair students with a partner and have them find other patterns on their hundreds chart. Ask, "What other ways can you find to count to 100 using the hundreds chart?"
  • Have students complete the Missing Numbers: At the Pond worksheet.
(5 minutes)
  • As students work, take anecdotal notes to capture student thinking and assess their ability to follow the counting sequence from 1-100.
  • Collect student work to assess if students were able to accurately write and count numbers between 1-100.
(3 minutes)
  • Gather students back together.
  • Have students come up to a predesigned bulletin board & staple their beautiful visuals up to create a classroom hundreds chart to refer to throughout the year!
  • Close by asking students to think about and share out other strategies for counting to 100.

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