February 14, 2019
|
by Caitlin Hardeman

EL Support Lesson

What Are Equivalent Fractions?

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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Equivalent Fractions: Are They Equal? lesson plan.
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This lesson can be used as a pre-lesson for the Equivalent Fractions: Are They Equal? lesson plan.
Academic

Students will be able to determine if two fractions are equivalent using visuals.

Language

Students will be able to identify equivalent fractions with key grade level vocabulary using visuals and sentence frames for support.

(4 minutes)
  • Display the first page of the Fractions: What Do You Notice? worksheet on the document camera and do a Think-Pair-Share activity.
  • Give students about one minute to look at it and think about what they notice about the images, without providing any prompting regarding equivalent fractions.
  • Pair students together and instruct them to discuss what they noticed about the images. Then, call on students to share what they discussed with their partners.
  • Share the Language Objective for the lesson and tell students that they will be identifying equivalent fractions in this lesson. They'll use some vocabulary words as they explain what they see in pictures and drawings.
(6 minutes)
  • Teach the vocabulary words by showing the Vocabulary Cards for equivalent and fraction.
  • Explain that equivalent means that something is the same or equal to something else. Tell students that you have half of an orange for lunch. Draw a circle with two equal sides. Shade one side in to represent the part of the orange that you have. Add that you also brought a half of a sandwich, and draw a rectangle with two equal sides. Shade one side in to represent the part that you have. Point out that these pictures are equivalent because they both show 1/2.
  • Review that 1/2 is a fraction. The fraction shows a part of a whole. The one represents what you have out of the whole. The two represents how many equal parts are in the whole.
  • Return to the first page of the Fractions: What Do You Notice? worksheet. Model thinking aloud about the fractions by using the sentence frame, "These fractions are equivalent because ____." Label the fractions for each of the pictures.
(10 minutes)
  • Display the second page of the Fractions: What Do You Notice? worksheet on the document camera.
  • Engage the class in thinking about similarities and differences and ask, "Which one doesn't belong?" Prompt learners to think about the following questions:
    • What value is shown in each picture? (Sentence stem: This picture shows ____.)
    • What shapes do you see? (Sentence stem: I see ____.)
    • How are these two pictures similar? How are they different? (Sentence stem: These pictures are similar/different because ____.)
    • Which three pictures are most alike? Why? (Sentence stem: These three pictures are most alike because ____.)
    • Why doesn't this picture belong with the others? (Sentence stem: This picture doesn't belong with the others because ____.)
  • Explain that the square with three equal parts doesn't belong because the rest of the pictures have four equal parts. It also only has two of the parts shaded in, which makes the fraction 2/3. The other three pictures have three shaded parts, which makes the fractions 3/4.
(12 minutes)
  • Divide the class into four small groups and pass out the Equivalent Fractions: Which One Doesn't Belong? worksheet to each student.
  • Assign each group one of the problems on the worksheet to complete. Tell learners that they all need to be prepared to explain to a different group how they agreed on which pictures belong together and justify which item did not fit.
  • Give groups time to work through their problem. Then, create new groups. Make sure each group has a student that can explain each of the problems on the worksheet. Instruct them to share their thinking and prompt students as needed with the following questions and sentence stems:
    • What value is shown in each picture? (Sentence stem: This picture shows ____.)
    • What shapes do you see? (Sentence stem: I see ____.)
    • How are these two pictures similar? How are they different? (Sentence stem: These pictures are similar/different because ____.)
    • Which three pictures are most alike? Why? (Sentence stem: These pictures are most alike because ____.)
    • Why doesn't this picture belong with the others? (Sentence stem: This picture doesn't belong with the others because ____.)

Beginning

  • Allow access to reference materials in home language (L1).
  • Have learners repeat instructions and key vocabulary to the teacher.
  • Provide a word bank of key terms and phrases for students to use in group and class discussions.
  • Group students intentionally based on academic and language needs.

Advanced

  • Allow learners to utilize glossaries and dictionaries for unfamiliar words.
  • Choose advanced ELs to share their ideas first in group and class discussions.
  • Have learners repeat instructions and key vocabulary, summarizing important information for the class.
(6 minutes)
  • Display a completed Frayer Model graphic organizer for the word fraction. Explain the purpose and sections of the graphic organizer to the class and share how you gathered the information to complete each section.
  • Distribute a blank Frayer Model graphic organizer to each student. Instruct them to complete the graphic organizer with information for the word equivalent.
(2 minutes)
  • Review the information that goes into the Frayer Model for the word equivalent. Have students share and create a teacher copy to display in the classroom as reference for future lessons.
  • Remind the class that finding and recognizing equivalent fractions makes it easier for us to problem solve in many situations in our everyday lives. Share examples of when you have needed to use equivalent fractions, such as cooking or working with time, and ask students to share examples of their own. Point out that being able to visualize and explain equivalent fractions is an important foundation to have.

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