Lesson Plan

The Clock Struck What?

It's time-telling time with this fun lesson featuring Trudy Harris' 'The Clock Struck One.' Students will learning about time with a short story and hands-on practice with analog clocks.
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Need extra help for EL students? Try the Clock Concentration pre-lesson.
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Need extra help for EL students? Try the Clock Concentration pre-lesson.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to tell and write time to the hour and half hour.

The adjustment to the whole group lesson is a modification to differentiate for children who are English learners.
EL adjustments

Introduction

(10 minutes)
Telling Time to the HourTime Practice:  On the Hour and Half HourHalf-Hour Match Up
  • Read aloud The Clock Struck One.
  • Ask students review questions from the story, for example: "What time did the mouse run up the clock?" "At what time did the cat wake up?"
  • Tell the class that, today, they will tell and write time to the hour and half hour using analog clocks.

Beginning

  • Before reading the story, ask students to name different devices for telling time, such as different types of clocks and watches.
  • Show students the picture of the grandfather clock. Point to the other types of clocks in the book and have students repeat as you name them: cuckoo clock, alarm clock, pocket watch, etc.

Intermediate

  • Rephrase the story as you read. Think aloud, "It says the clock struck one. That means it was 1 o'clock. I see the clock shows 1 o'clock, so that makes sense with what I see in the picture.
  • Explain the struck is the past tense of strike. Strike can mean different things, including to hit something. In the story it means to tell something by sound. The sound of bells is heard on a grandfather clock exactly on the hour, so exactly at 1 o'clock, 2 o'clock, etc.