Science Project:

Are Armspan and Height Genetically Determined?

4.7 based on 7 ratings

Materials:

  • Tape measure
  • Calculator

Procedure

  1. Using a tape measure, measure your height to the nearest inch.
  2. Stretch your arms out to either side as far as they can go. Measure the distance between your fingertips.
  3. Record your data in a chart.
  4. Divide your height by your armspan to get the ratio between the two values.
  5. Repeat this process with at least three family members (siblings, parents, and grandparents) and at least three unrelated friends.
  6. Calculate the average of the ratios for your family, and the average of the ratios for your friends. Do not include yourself in these calculations, and record this data.
  7. Calculate the average deviation for your family. To do this, subtract your family average (from Step 6) from your own ratio (from Step 4), and divide by the family average again. Record this data.
  8. Repeat this process to find the average deviation for your friends. Just subtract your friend average (from Step 6) from your own ratio (from Step 4), and divide this by your friend average again. Record this data.
  9. Compare the two average deviations. Which is smaller? The smaller of the two belongs to the group of people whose ratio is closest to yours. Use this information to support or reject your hypothesis.
  10. If you’d like, you can repeat this process with several other people, as well as their friends and relatives. This will give you more accurate results.

References:

First Place Science Fair Projects for Inquisitive Kids, by Elizabeth Snoke Harris. Pp. 29-30.

Author: Keren Perles
Disclaimer and Safety Precautions

Education.com provides the Science Fair Project Ideas for informational purposes only. Education.com does not make any guarantee or representation regarding the Science Fair Project Ideas and is not responsible or liable for any loss or damage, directly or indirectly, caused by your use of such information. By accessing the Science Fair Project Ideas, you waive and renounce any claims against Education.com that arise thereof. In addition, your access to Education.com's website and Science Fair Project Ideas is covered by Education.com's Privacy Policy and site Terms of Use, which include limitations on Education.com's liability.

Warning is hereby given that not all Project Ideas are appropriate for all individuals or in all circumstances. Implementation of any Science Project Idea should be undertaken only in appropriate settings and with appropriate parental or other supervision. Reading and following the safety precautions of all materials used in a project is the sole responsibility of each individual. For further information, consult your state's handbook of Science Safety.

How likely are you to recommend Education.com to your friends and colleagues?

Not at all likely
Extremely likely